About your Search

20121128
20121206
STATION
CNBC 20
CSPAN 14
FBC 12
CSPAN2 9
CNNW 7
MSNBCW 6
KQED (PBS) 4
KCSM (PBS) 2
SFGTV2 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
KTVU (FOX) 1
LINKTV 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 97
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)
? i would argue east of these questions carried fairly profound rule of law implications. as xi jinping rises to take the top position in china and wrestles with new challenges and attempts to answer any questions, i would argue that many of them are based in basic rule of law doctorate -- doctrine. the most important steps ahead for china will be around bolstering the rule of law. the implications are profound for expanding civil society, for human rights, for addressing the needs of ordinary citizens, for building a greater economic certainty. rule of law is an essential pillar of our democracy. for china, rule of law is the best way of regulating and settling disputes in society. serving as a check against the abuse of power. the real question for china over the next few years will be, what reigns supreme for the world's second largest economy -- the party or the law? despite setbacks in recent years, wen jiabao said, rule of law will be one of three components of any future democracy along with dignity, justice, and independence as guarantees in any reform efforts. number 2,
the region and with the world as china looks at, a sense of harmony, japan would be law, that sense of harmony and how you would achieve it is that their frustration is that the work is not just acquiescing to the notion that they are a rich country, that they are returning, that they're powerful, that they want respect. and they want to see the world kind of step back and give it greater latitude, but doesn't see this. this is what i think whether i personally think we are on a collision course. because when you look at what china's expectations of the world are, you also look at its paranoia, you look at jim, i'd love to hear utah, you're such an expert insider, what's going on in the cyber world. you see something which seems hard to me, despite her best efforts in not one to replace history, that the rise of a great power usually and often leads to messiness. usually and often leads to conflict. let's get some conversation from those of you who are thinking sisley that this is supposed to be a no-nonsense forum on military and secret strategy. i don't want you to predict war, bu
public space from march to marketplaces to shops, although the law does not mention the word women, muslim, bertha or bail it was introduced by president nicolas sarkozy and a ban on muslim veiling which according to him imprisons women and threatens french values of dignity and equality. the new law makes illegal the barca but france is the first country to enact a full ban on the burke that in public space similar restrictions of being considered all over europe and many countries in regions that adopted some type. on april 28, 2011, the chamber of representatives of belgium voted for a similar ban although the law expected to be challenged in a constitutional court. in spain in 2010 the catalonia and assembly narrowly rejected a proposed ban on a burke got in all public places reversing an earlier vote. similar laws are in progress in italy as well. in switzerland after a campaign designed to appeal to fears of a muslim takeover, a popular referendum voted by 57% to ban the construction of minarets associated with mosques, despite the fact that very few mosques in switzerland ac
things that could rap right now is the house could vote and the president would sign into law legislation that would provide certainty for middle-class families. 98% of american families, and some 97% of small businesses. so it's time for the house to act. secondly, i think we have to take steps to make sure that we're creating jobs at a faster pace, as i mentioned before. i'm introducing legislation today to help middle-class families and -- middle noik families and to boost hiring. it would expand the payroll tax cut from last year for one year and give employers a tax credit for hiring. and i'll be talking about that legislation. now, the payroll cut that we -- tax cut that we put into place last year had a number of benefits. i won't go through all of those today but the joint economic committee, the committee of which i'm the chairman, just put out a report in the last 24 hours, it's a fact sheet that highlights some of the benefits of the payroll tax cut. mr. president, just for the record i would ask consent that the joint economic committee fact sheet on the payroll tax cut dated
on the bill they just debated, changing federal energy efficiency laws. we'll take you live next to the capital, the chair and co-chair of the democratic caucus, just starting a briefing talking about the fiscal cliff and jobs. it's live here on c-span. >> and continues to preach the kind of message that i think the nation needs, one of compromise but one of assurity that we are going to be looking out tore the interest of the middle class and the protection of social security, medicare and medicaid for the people who are in such desperate need of those great programs that are the hallmark of our country. we have repeatedly said and our caucus again just confirmed that job creation equals deficit reduction, and we must put the country back to work. we have proposals that are on the floor. we still believe that even with the -- what little time remains and what little time remains when we're actually working, this is still possible. this is still doable. this is not a democrat or republican issue. republicans believe that america needs to go back to work. it's just a matter of hav
the president has gotten tougher than he was in the first term and he lays down the law again today. >> the thinking is that the republicans will have more leverage because there will be another debt ceiling and we'll extract with stronger leverage on the debt ceiling. i just have to tell you that is--that is a bad strategy for america. it's a bad strategy for your businesses. and it is not a game that i will play. >> cenk: damn! he's not going to play that game. i hope he means it. so we'll see how that turns out of course. now let's have some fun. let's bring in jude freeman. a conservative in los angeles. what happened, due get lost. >> and jewish, yes very lost. >> cenk: let's talk about boehner and the grand bargain. are you with the heritage who says it's too soft or does it make sense. >> grover norquist said we should film it all. republicans, democrats and just call it survival washington, and watch this for 24 hours as long as it takes them to work something out. >> cenk: yes, it's not going to happen, and i'll tell you why the guys who will block it are the republicans. i
in baltimore, and i think um, that changed when the law enforcement er, and the nixon administration, launched the war on drugs, and er, baltimore changed. and i've been in law enforcement now for over thirty three years. i think i've got a very good grasp of what's going on out here in the streets, and what needs to change. from the law enforcement perspective, we need to change our policies quick. >>the problem of drugs in colombia, have different characteristics from anywhere of in the world. and it's an international security issue. so our policy is very aggressive against all elements of drug trafficking. one of the elements is eradication. eradication of crops. air spraying, which was er the basic element of reduction of production. but in two thousand five, we started the process of manual eradication. it's more effective but you need the combination of both. of air spraying in many areas where it's very difficult. and manual eradication where where there is more territorial control. these talking points, that the right have, about the "heavy hand of government" ... i want to have that
off on that document bit by bit. they voted controversially to keep islamic law as the main source of legislation. most of the political opposition is boycotting the assembly. the document aims to transfer more power to egypt's parliament. critics say it is being rammed through too hastily. critics have already gathered where the president is expected to make an announcement. british lawmakers are looking at new ways to regulate the press. the calls for tougher guidelines come after an enquiry's report on crimes committed by reporters as they sought out sensational news stories. >> the inquiry picked up its work after 10 reporters were arrested at rupert murdoch's "news of the world" newspaper. among the charges, bribing the police. the inquiry has found the violations span decades. >> as the inquiry findings were read, activists gathered to protest what they termed robert murdoch's media mafia. the report found that reporters had routinely -- routinely packed into phones of celebrities. it has led to scores of arrests and some criminal charges. as a result, he said -- than of the
and she orchesated his abusend death. prosecutors have indicted sumida's husband, sister-in-law, and sons. investigators say victims were held in her condo against their will, deprived of food and water and physically abused before they died. in most cases they say relatives of the victims were the ones who carried out the abuse. police have found five bodies. they believe four other people who are listed as missing are connected to this case and likely dead. investigators say sumida's crimes could date back a decade. during that time, citizens and police had warning signs. but they didn't act. lax law enforcement is partially to blame, but so is the japanese tendency to respect privacy. earlier, gene otani spoke with nhk world's reporter covering this story. >> you have been following the case. how did this case come to light? >> yes, gene. it first came up a year ago when a woman fled to a police station and said she'd been kidnapped and held against her will. since then the police have found dead bodies in diffent pts of western japan. investigators say sumida was the mastermind behind
expression. ( drumbeats ) taxation without representation: copley's father-in-law, an english merchant, was importing tea to america. copley felt he could not speak out against his family, nor could he defend them. seeking his artistic heritage, he sailed for europe. it wasn't long before he became part of that heritage, a forerunner in the great romantic movement. still, the longer his self-imposed exile in england, the greater his loneliness. his children were his models. the commissions continued. but his greatest masterpieces were painted while memory and imagination were fresh. ( drumbeats, lively trumpet notes ) in his isolation in england, copley worked harder to be america's first great painter. "poor america," he wrote, "yet certain i am she will finally emerge from her present calamity and become a mighty empire. and it is a pleasing reflection that i shall stand amongst the first of the artists that shall have led the country to the knowledge and cultivation of the fine arts." narrator: ...yet george catlin had a grander dream: he was an artist in search of a cause. ( native
. that is the weakness of the case and that is the problem with much of our effort against terrorism. many of these law enforcement activities are fake crimes. i have a real beef against fake crimes. >> bill: so you are siding with the judge? >> i think the judge. >> bill: even though these guys clearly knew what they were doing, that is moving tons of cocaine, involving al al qaeda, killers, they knew they were doing that they just didn't see the cocaine. only thing they didn't see was the actual drug. after they are caught and come back with a conspiracy rap that gets them 20 if the judge is tough. you say no, give them a little, like this. >> there was no real drug deal. >> bill: you know what the intent was. >> you know what their state of mind is. but this -- i submit to you, please, i submit that i could convince almost anyone with living on the margins of life. >> bill: no one in this room and they all live on the margins would do this. all right. nobody here. >> you can seduce people into going along with al qaeda. >> bill: and transporting tons of cocaine. come on. >> the people involved in th
>> steve: up in the great state of washington. same-sex law takes affect on december 6th. what that means, the department of health. they have all of those forms to fill out when people get married. they are proposing to get rid of bride and groom and husband and wife and replace it with something . they haven't figured out. it might be spouse a or spouse b or person a or person b. >> brian: person a takes to the be the lawful wedded mate. >> gretchen: you can't even explain it. when you try to explain you go down a bumpy road. guess how many people complain and want to take bride and groom out of the marriage certificate process. >> brian: we can't hear their answers. >> gretchen: so guess how many people. >> brian: a lot. >> steve: i don't know. >> gretchen: brian said a lot. >> steve: probably not that many. the problem is they changed the law and voted it in and now the government is trying to catch up what the people want. >> gretchen: they voted it in to law same-sex person. one person complained. >> brian: well >> brian: well. was it the brood or the groom. >> society we live n one
experience. he is a graduate of yale law school. he clerked for the conservative judge james buckley on the u.s. court of appeals for the d.c. circuit following graduation. so you have to ask why did it take seven months for the senate to finally after waiting seven months, we'll talk about it for 20 minutes, then we'll vote his nomination. why the seven-month delay? republican obstruction. now, after this vote, the senate remains backlogged with 17 judicial nominations that go back to before the august, the august recess. senate republicans are establishing another harmful precedent by refusing to proceed on judicial nominees with bipartisan support before the end of the session. they held up judicial nominees three years ago, they did it two years ago, they did it last year. now they are doing it again this year. they found a new way to employ their own trick of a pocket filibuster. they stalled nominees into the next year. and then they forced the senate in the new year to work on nominees from the past year. delay and delay and delay and push other confirmations back in time, then cut off
law in the new constitution. concerns about the protection of women's rights in this constitution. basically this is document written by the muslim brotherhood because all liberal members of this assembly walked out long ago, bill. bill: is there a chance that will diffuse the protests we have seen so far, steve? >> reporter: the hopes were on the president's side that this could diffuse the protests. this constitution would go to a referendum, be voted on and president morsi would give up his extraordinary powers. what we see is the reverse. it has inflamed the opposition. we could see one of the biggest protest demonstrations today we've seen so far, bill. bill: steve harrigan, thank you. we're waiting and watching for more developments out of cairo, egypt. we're coming after the moment where prayers end on a friday afternoon. so watch that story. martha: crowds in those streets. we'll keep an eye on it. we're just getting started on this friday morning, everybody. there is new information on the health of president george h.w. bush after he was admitted to the hospital. we have
to be an expert in islamic law if you want to have a prayer of discussing laws. there's lots of things like that. that's what's angering a lot of these liberals. >> steve, do you think the islamists will be able to push this through? >> egypt is a country of stunning ironies. they have pushed it through. the question is whether people will accept it. i think this was all kicked off by the fact that revolutionaries, supporters determined that they were not going to allow the muslim brotherhood to run the table unchallenged. it's unclear whether they will be able to overthrow morsi but they want to teach him a lesson by coming out into the streets and saying we will no longer be ruled by decree. you cannot take away the rights that we fought so hard for during those days of january and february of 2011. >> if you think of it, egypt is the great experiment. everybody now understands democracy is not just elections. it's liberal constitutionalism. it's these documents. it's civil society. egypt seems to be going in the direction of not liberal democracy but illiberal democracy. >> right. you're abs
to do ts he had to violate a law because there is law that says every six months you have to come out with the cost in terms of jobs and money of new regulations. and that was due the 31st of october. he just, you know, flagrantly disobeyed the law so people didn't know. now we're looking at these huge things coming on us, i'm talking about, the, you've seen the whole list. melissa: i hear you. it is agonizing. no, i hear you. senator, thank you so much for coming on the show. we appreciate your time. >> thank you, melissa. melissa: here is our "money" question of the day, should a higher federal gas tax be part of a fiscal cliff compromise? we want to hear what you think. like us on facebook.co facebook.com/melissafrancisfox or follow me on twitter twitter,@melissaafrancis where almost no one liked the tax. >>> fuel gauge report tod, oil fell more than half a percent settling at 87.18 a barrel. >>> six u.s. senators are asking justice department to launch a probe of west coast oil refineries. remember we told you about this story. recent analysis, refineries were operating earlier th
reenforcing so you have more political inequalities that generates laws and regulations that leads to more economic inequality and political inequality. a -- an example i could find, something like bankruptcy law, something very technical that no one is interested in, one provision of the bankruptcy law is that when you go bankrupt, who gets paid first? a big issue. the answer is the derivative. not a surprise because they put it in when anyone else is not noticing who pays attention to bankruptcy laws? what does that mean? it means you encourage that kind of economic inequality. at the other extreme student loans can't be discharged even in bankruptcy, so that means the banks do well, but it really discourages people borrowing for student loans and in a country where we have tuition going up the last three years, average state university up 40%, the cutbacks in state budgets, incomes are going down, the only way people can afford it is borrowing and then they realize they get cheated as a lot of them have been, particularly in the for profit private schools, the result of that is if you d
in the courthouse when d.n.a. started coming into be used at the courthouse. prior to that many law enforcement and prosecutors had to rely on blood samples and fingerprints, but once d.n.a. came in and we learned everybody has a unique genetic makeup and it can be connected and traced to perpetrators of crime when they commit a crime, especially in sexual assault cases. and convictions have gone up. the evidence is better. the proof beyond a reasonable doubt is much more available in d.n.a. cases. in 1985, there was a 13-year-old girl named lavenia masters. she lived in dallas, texas. she told her folks good night. she went to her bedroom which should be, mr. speaker, the safest place on earth for children -- went to sleep and during the middle of the night she was woken up by an outlaw putting a knife to her throat and he sexually assaulted her. then he snuck away in the darkness of the night. that was in 1985. she went to the hospital. her parents took care of her medical needs. d.n.a. evidence was taken from her. it was given to the law enforcement authorities, but that d.n.a. evidence from
hit by threatening to cut jobs and working hours as a way to deal with the new healthcare law. darden restaurant group, owner of the olive garden and red lobster, just cut its profit forecast for the year, specifically citing failed promotions and the pr problem it encountered after admitting to limiting employee hours. under the affordable care act, companies with more than 50-full time employees are required to offer basic health coverage for workers or face a fine. other restaurant chains have also generated backlash after publicly complaining about obamacare. "i think the point is that the restaurant industry shouldn't expect to be able to have this advantageous position relative to many other industries that employ a lot of people and do pay healthcare benefits. and, quite frankly, it is the law, so we'll all have to deal with it and manage through it. that was restaurant consultant bob goldin of technomic. darden shares were down 10% yesterday. the founder of software company autonomy is on the defense. this week, autonomy founder mike lynch launched a website addressing allegat
as result of it they created a loan program that got me into college law school. we can't give up on that. this kid from east st. louis illinois and for many others, these loans make a big difference whether it's pell grants or loans, but let's look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid to education goes to for-profit schools. they have 12% of the students, 25% of the federal aid to education, and more than double the student loan default rate of any other class higher education. there are ways to cut back in spending in education particularly as is wasted on some of the schools that will give us opportunities for resources for real education. which can be part of our future. now let me come to the most painful topic of all, entitlements. social security was included in the simpson-bowles report but i didn't agree with every aspect of it, but i thought that was a sensible approach to breathing life into social security beyond its current longevity. i also like and it to 82 when asking your, and 83 and was told that social security is on its way out in six months, we'll be out of money.
because of law enforcement tactics and focus, you end up caught up in a system where you can never move on. you're permanently trapped and weighed down by having a felony conviction. the reason i call it a war on crumbs is the type of people we see at the hall of justice, i brought with me some props. i brought with me a sweetener packet. this is a gram of sweetener. most of the time this is on the high end of the amount of narcotics we see people in possession of. sometimes people have two or three sweetener packages on them and we call them drug dealers, you know. that's why we call it a war on crumbs because the amounts we are talking about are mine us schedule. -- minnesota us schedule. the fact -- are miniscule. and based on less than a packet of sweetener, to me is outrageous. and to me this is a positive first step, in my opinion, because at least you remove some of the stigma attached to this type of issue which in my opinion should be a public health issue. it's a public health issue for a certain segment of the community and should be a public health community issue for everybody
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
to take these young women when they are interacting with law enforcement because a lot of them find themselves into prostitution and get treated like perpetrators as opposed to victims. this is the psychology of a perpetrator but they are victims and we have to get law enforcement and our judicial system to treat these women as victims and put them in a setting to pull themselves away from drug addition. >> in a minute, politico is -- politico is going to ask you some questions. one of the questions that has come in, who is the best leader in washington, d.c.? >> robert griffin, iii. >> why did the majority of americans reject the republican party in the recent election? >> it was an election and it was a very close election. if you look at the nims and the differences between the two. i think the republican party can do a better job of limited government and freep enterprise movement and connect those policies. >> why has there been a failure to connect? >> i'm not sure there is one reason for it and i haven't had time to think about it why it has happened but it needs to happen. t
earlier to keep sharia law as the main sport of legislation there. how about the lucky folks who struck it really big? only two tickets matched the powerball tickets last night. the prize is $579.9 million with $379.8 million cash option which to me is like 380 million anyway. melissa: i had one number. lori: i am rich in great colleagues. employees of knight capital say an eerie silence have descended over the company with competing bid for the trading outfit. charlie gasparino with latest on the future of knight capital. >> if i won, guess it would not be making this call to break the news. no, i did not win. i do not gamble. here's the thing, what is kind of interesting is we have not yet gotten sort of a pressure release by virtue of what is offered. i have a lot of calls, it is owned by viola, former nymex ceo. that is kind of weird. another preservation's last night, another discussed terms, but you generally get a press release or official bid. we don't have that yet, so we are waiting on that. the other thing we should point out is tha getco's offer, how wl they get at $3.50? yo
said in a law that they would pay that money back in a trust fund. but there is suspicion on whether that is rarely ever going to happen. that feeds into their concern about what will happen to social security. is it going to be changed in ways that affect the benefits? host: all of the calls to simplify the tax code, to streamline it, and that may certainly mean to itemize the credits of that take place on the tax returns. guest: the complexity of the tax system is a huge problem. everyone from the irs on down to congress and the industry out there, if you will, the financial accounting industry, everyone recognizes is an enormous problem and causes people to pay a lot more than they otherwise would. most people do not do their own taxes anymore because they are so complex. they rely on software that is kind of a black box. it is hard to know how the tax system works anymore. people do not have as much of an incentive to take a deduction if they do not know it is there. and the software is what they are depending on. host: does simplifying the tax code as necessarily mean lessening
the state of wisconsin, also pat houston, whitney houston's sister-in-law and manager and jeopardy champion ken jennings written a new book. it's tuesday, december 4th, "starting point" begins right now. >>> welcome everybody, you're watching "starting point." we're honored this morning to have the former british prime minister tony blair with us as our guest. he's going to be weighing in as a number of topics. we're going to talk about the fiscal cliff, we're going to talk about the global economy. we're going to talk about the civil war in syria. we'll talk about the royal baby coming soon. first we want to get right to zoraida sambolin for an update on the day's top stories. >> soledad, the fiscal cliff debacle, with 28 days remaining before drastic tax hikes and spending cuts take effect, a republican spending plan has been rejected by the white house. brianna keilar is live from washington. what now, brianna? >> well, right now it's about the pressure building and the clock kicking, zoraida. as house republicans in the white house try to ultimately broker a deal between two very differ
four weeks to go until the deadline. be careful what you say in a local police want a law, new law requiring that text messages be saved for two years. how do you feel about that? ever texted something you wish would go away right now? there is of course the privacy issue as well. well, here comes the judge. he will be new at 10 on this one. got it. shares of darden restaurants, they're down today and they're the company that runs olive garden, red lobster, and they're down a lot. why is that, nicole? >> this is not good news here, they did a ton of promotions and now they're saying the promotions didn't work and in turn they're expecting numbers for the earnings season that will be below the analyst expectations and they're expecting sales at the olive garden to be down 3.2%. and at red lobster, 2.7% so sales are weakening, the earnings per share below what they anticipated and so, now, the ceo, so interesting, we need to come up with a new plan and we are going to work on different promotion because the current quarter is disappointing. do you think? >> well, nicole, hold on a se
through college and law school. these loans make a big difference, whether it is pell grants or loans. let me look at this honestly. 25% of the federal aid education goes to for-profit schools. they have more than double the student loan default rate than any other. there are ways to cut back on spending and education that will give us opportunities and resources for real education, which can be part of our future. when it comes to the most painful topic of all. i came here in 1983 and was told social security would be on its way out. we rolled up with our sleeves and came up with a bipartisan solution that ultimately bought over 50 years of solvency for social security. we raised the retirement age, payable taxes on social security, and we taxed those social security benefits indirectly for the first time. today, social security will make every promised payment for the next 22 years. you cannot say that about much in washington. social security has not added one penny to the deficit. for those who say there is good reason to push it off the table and wait, i would add a note of caution. s
expert opinions, they've ghost written court judgments. in our view, they've violated numerous laws, both in ecuador and the united states. all of it is available on videotape depositions and in e-mails because the crime fraud exception has been invoked by numerous judges in the united states. our strategy is to fight it, fight it hard. we feel we'll prevail in the end. >> i know this is a significant case, however, this is also sort of the normal for the industry, isn't it? this is the uphill battle you're fighting all the time, this hostility. >> rule of law, i would say, is the biggest risk not just to our industry but business in general. the world is becoming much more international and interconnected. it's very important that we have laws and norms that are functioning. so companies like ours and others can have a predictable and successful business overseas. this case is a little bit different in that it's a fraud. >> what kind of growth are you expecting in the next year at chevron? you've been outperforming your peers for many years now. what can investors expect? >> we have a go
it at the 2010 health law, affordable care act. that is a massive cost weight on the american people. it is a deeply unpopular issue. still it was relatively ignored during the election but it's still an active issue. and we have to provide assurance. americans have told us. they told us in the exit polling, they've told us in a number of other forms that they do not want to see burdens increased on our small businesses. >> mcconnell didn't mention that. i mean, that's a different thing. hadley, let me go to you on this. mcdonnell mentioned -- i'm going to read this from the "wall street journal." higher medicare premiums for the wealthy, an increase in the medicare eligibility age, retirement age and slowing of c colas. he said that's their position. isn't it time for them to come out with that boehner-mcconnell, here it is here's what we want right now? >> from a strategy standpoint i think the republicans should put some counter offer on the table. but i think they tend to lose sight of the forest for the trees when we start to talk about the aspects of this deal, that deal, the o
organizations call the current law baseline. what that means is that what scheduled to go into effect already is baked into the cake. and because the bush tax cuts are expiring provisions that were voted for ten years ago, it doesn't really count as a tax hike when they're already scheduled to take effect. so as long as republicans can just keep the revenue below what taxes would raise to in full expiration of the bush tax cuts, they won't be violating the pledge. >> kevin, that sounds incredibly reasonable. do you think grover norquist shares that interpretation? >> so there's an important distinction to be made between what the pledge actually says and what americans for tax reform, his activist organization advocates for. as grover said himself, the pledge is to the american people, not to grover norquist. so it's not just, you know, republicans need grover norquist's approval for what they want to do. it's more that americans for tax reform wants to keep tax rates low despite the fact that legislation says they're just going to go up no matter if congress doesn't do anything. >> all right
you're going to to on the tax side. that's simple. you have to pass a law that says the present law has to be overridden. the argument is whether it's overridden for people over 250,000. >> and what would be your position on that? >> oh, i think the simple thing to do, obviously do what the president is saying. he ran a campaign on it. if you have to act in three weeks, you're not going to revise the whole income tax code in the next three weeks. all this business about deductions may be perfectly legitimate and i think that both income tax -- personal income tax and corporate income tax need a lot of thought and a lot of revision. they're both broken. but you're not going to do that in three weeks. the challenge that i see is in three weeks you've got to have some convincing balance of the tax side, the revenue side, with the expenditure side. you can't change the expenditures in three weeks. you can indicate intentions, but you can't -- >> we'll have more of that conversation throughout the show including interesting comments he has about bernanke and interest rates and what's goi
to put it in an amusing way, it is the need to get out of your mother in law's house. pretty intuitive concept when you think about it. we have a break here. because the market is so darn tough. and that could be your chance for the analysts. here is the bottom line. we need hope to be van switkwis. he so that it is so negative. have them leave the room. and we can return to the growth themes and they are autos and homes. by them on the way down and never on the way down as the scared sellers buy them out. you can take your time. who the heck knows when and from what level you can get back in. why don't we go to tom in new york. >> big lots and slower same store sales and make it a buy. it had it's gob and i don't want you to come in now. i think that big lots is not a great operator. the market needs to free itself from the notion that there will be a deal. that is what needs to happen. take your time. this hope is still not dashed enough to make this market immune from more disappointment. "mad money" will be right back. shop until you drop? the holiday shopping season is in full swi
out of your mother-in-law's house. get your own home. intuitive concept for those, when you think about it. we got to break here as toll brothers actually down on the news today because the market's so darn tough. i expect downgrades tomorrow from people who don't believe things can stay this strong and that could be your strong to be analysts who always downgrade ar the report. here's the bottom line. we need hope to be vanquished. we need it spindled, mutilated. chex out the holders, thinking it's imminent and leave the room and then return to what i've been tracing and huge cycles of pent-up demand. buy them on the way down. never on the way up. you can take your time. do not leave this market wholesale. who the heck knows when and from what level you can get back in. why don't we go to tom in new york. tom? >> caller: hi, jim. could this offset same-store sales and make it a buy? >> i think it moved already. one of those stocks that moves in gigantic gobs, to speak and had its gob and i don't want you to come in now. not a great operator. one of thebounces up and down, it's no
the manufacturing company at noon eastern an c-span2 3. >> worked his way up, went to harvard law school and then immigrated out west to illinois where the lead mine industry was in its hey day. he arrived after about a month's journey by shi ship, by stagecoach, by train and arrived on this steam boat in this muddy mining town boarded himself in a log cabin, established a law practice in a log cabin and worked his way up and became a successful lawyer. and got involved politically and ran for congress eight terms. and then befriended abraham lincoln from illinois. and then grant. and as they were on the rice, wash burn stayed with them as a close colleague during the civil war. and after grant was elected president he initially appointed him secretary of state. and at that time he became very ill. so after about ten days, he submitted his resignation to president grant and so he accepted his resignation. so over the next several months he refained his health which was always very fradge jill. so grant then offered him the position as interior -- ambassador to france. >> providing politi
, dividends. current laws, they go back up. dividends treated as ordinary income. capital gains goes back up to 20%. how much revenue are we talking about? if those become bargaining chips, how much are we giving up? >> under current law, the capital gains rate is scheduled to go to 20%. we are actually talking 23.8%. dividends are scheduled to go to ordinary rates. you need the 3.8% for people who have higher incomes. significant increases in both are scheduled. as you think about the fiscal cliff and what is coming, one of the few places you can see people responding to it is in their behavior around capital gains and dividends. companies are moving up to how, shareholders take a vintage of a lower rate. i expect you will see more investors realize lower capital gains in order to get lower rates. there is clearly money there. there is clearly money that has interesting, distributional characteristics. as you think about the political process trying to structure when a package with a revenue goal and a distribution goal, my prediction is you will see at least some of those increases occur.
is that not all law applied to household. he said it's time for society and the judicial system to change so potential crimes can be prevented both outside and inside home. >>> residents of a city in central japan have taken part in an annual ritual. they held a festival to pray and give thanks for a good harvest. >> reporter: they call it rising dragon. and the dragon carries messages to the heavens. the residents of fujieda hold this festival every other year at the end of october. they make the 20-meter missiles by hand. and they compete to make the most dazzling launch. but there's more to the festival than fireworks. as the rockets soar toward heaven, some people recite their personal messages. children take part. like the students of this local elementary school. they began practicing a month before the festival. and who better to teach them than this man. he has been reciting messages for 35 years. >> translator: you don't just sing and you just don't read. you have to put your feelings into it. >> reporter: the children muse about the messages they want the missiles to carry to heave
pesticides that exceed the law. they pulled about 900 tons off the province. authorities and officials say the pesticide levels do not pose a health risk even for people who consume the tea daily. >>> archaeologists say they've made an important finding that could alter the history of japan's system of riding. they say they found earthen ware that suggests that hiragana characters could date back farther than currently believed. last year's archaeologists in the ancient capital of kyoto excavated 20 plates and other pottery items from the ruins of the home of an aristocrat. they say it dates back to the late 9th century. hirogana has believed to have become an established form of writing in the 10th century. >> translator: a large amount of earthen ware was discovered in the home of a noble family. this means the aristocrats of the time already had a good command of hiragana. >> they say it ho provides precious clues to how it involved in japan. >>> visitors to kyoto at this time of year enjoy its gardens and temples against a backdrop of colorful autumn leaves. nhk world's rina nakano vis
of a government that is refusing them compensation. under a law passed in 2007, the former dissidents are entitled to 14 euros for every day they spent in jail. most of the men have received only a fraction of that. we go to meet his father. the government has allotted him a room. the toilets down the corridor are hardly more than holes in the floor, and they stink. the father was also a victim of the dictatorship. he says the political prisoners were exploited and lost their property. >> i had a house in the center of town -- two bedrooms, a living room, with a big garden. today, there are three or four apartment buildings there. >> albania is celebrating 100 years of independence. flags lined the streets of the capital. the country wants to move closer to the rest of europe, and 11,000 former political prisoners are bad publicity. the main governing party says the hunger strike was opposite -- was orchestrated by the opposition. >> these actions are not normal. in fact, they are simply undemocratic. they are getting people to commit these actions for political motives. in this case, it is specif
that parliament at both houses need to approve any law to revise the boj law. but it would at apply pressure to take worldbolder steps to pr any revision to the law. >> could they just change the mandate? >> they could, but it's probably unlikely that the mandate will be changed. focusing on price stability. some politicians want the mandate to be changed so that job growth is added among their policy objectives. that's unlikely. but the government might ask the boj to set their inflation target at a higher rate than the current 1%, most likely 2%. >> why is a change of mandate unlikely? they're unhappy with what the bank of japan is doing and you're a democratically elected government, what's wrong with changing the mandate and get on with it? >> i think what's happening in japan is that inflation is there for so long, that changing any mandate dramatically without having the clear means to achieve it would just undermine the credibility of central bank as well as politicians and their policy making. so i think politicians are very much aware of that, so while they do apply stronger pressur
, but so far, it has been in vain. now he fears animal protection laws will become more lax than the real danger here is that some groups will see the crisis as an opportunity for turning back time. in terms of environmental protection and hunting as well. >> in crisis-wracked spain, the desperation to create jobs is producing questionable business models like providing a license to kill wild boars with lances. economic considerations aside, animal rights activists insist the practice does not present a pretty picture. >> i'm sure you will have your own views on that one. as a euro crisis crimes on, people all over europe are looking for safer ways to invest their money. in many countries, they believe the answer lies in property. property prices on many big cities are still booming, and that means there is a shortage of affordable housing for students or low-income families. people being priced out of a home has become a major problem in hamburg in germany with many people forced to live with relatives or to commute long distances to work or study in the city center. the challenge now is
of this subcommittee, criticized the bank in may when it announced this law saying it "made a very big and complicated that that now has gone very wrong." he is now one of the sentence leading critics of wall street. they did not comment on our story today. if a probe generates any substantive results, that could mean war headaches for ceo jamie dimon. it has been investigated whether -- that issue as well as the bank's internal controls oversight of traders and other matters could be among the subjects of the subcommittee's probe. melissa: peter barnes, thank you so much. lori: breaking news out of egypt. thousands of protesters ready to march on the palace to protest president morsy. melissa: let's see how the energy market is reacting to this. let's look at gold and silver and copper as we head out to break. crude is trading down. almost a full percentage point. we will be right back. ♪ ♪ lori: most popular segment, at least this hour. what you need to know to make some cash. recent comments that were made on the president's health care plan. charles: this is much broader than darden. social an
's a second option. right now conditioning can pass a law that would prevent a tax hike on first $250,000 of everybody's income, everybody. so that means 98% of americans, 97% of small businesses, wouldn't see their income taxes go up by a single dime because 98% of americans make $250,000 a or less. 97% of small businesses make year or less so if you say income taxes don't go up for any income above $250,000, the vast majority of americans, they don't see a tax hike. but here's the thing, even the top 2%,even folks who make more than $250,000, they'd still keep their tax cut on first $250,000 of income so it would still be for the for them, too, to get that done. families would have a sense of security going into the new year. companies like this one would know what to expect in terms of planning for next year and the year after. that means people's jobs would be secure. the sooner congress gets this done, the sooner our economy would get a boost and it would then give us in washington more time to work together on that longrange plan to bring down deficits in a balanced way. tax ref
and if it is done, it it is a bad d. >>guest: i am worried. the so-called fiscal cliff was put in law because it was stuff that would be so unacceptable congress would never let it happen, enormous tax increases, grotesque cuts in spending but here we, it is in the law. congress does nothing which congress is good at doing and go over the cliff and some want to see that happen because then the crisis will generate the kind of bipartisan agreement we need but that is irresponsible. >>neil: it is looking more likely. then who picks up the pieces? >>guest: the country suffers. i don't think anyone gains politically. you know that almost everyone here in both parties will tell you if you talk to them privately, this ends with entitlement reform. not cutting programs like medicare but slowing down the growth in the programs because they are the big drivers of the deficit and raising more out of the revenue, out of the tax system. whether you call iterates or reform over whatever you call it, and each those touches the third rail of the parties, we have to get together and say, basically, we have t
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 99 (some duplicates have been removed)